FS - Family Studies (FS)

FS 500. Families Studies Graduate Orientation. (1 Credit)

The purpose of the course is to orient students to the policies and procedures of the Family Studies graduate program. A grade of SP is given to students who satisfactorily complete all course assignments.

FS 501. Family Life Education. (3 Credits)

The purpose of the course is to increase students' understanding of the unique issues that children, youth, and families face and to help them to identify and apply appropriate research-based curricula that will help improve the quality of life of the families they serve. Students will become familiar with how to identify quality research-based programs, establish program goals, implement quality family life education programs, and evaluate programs for effectiveness.

FS 510. Family Diversity and Social Change. (3 Credits)

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the varying types of families they may encounter in research, policy, and human service careers and to help students become attuned to issues faced by families in a continually changing society.

FS 543. Social Psychology of Intimate Relationships. (3 Credits)

Social psychological analysis of the development, maintenance, and dissolution of intimate relationships such as friendship, courtship and marriage. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical and empirical basis of understanding intimate relationships.

FS 599. Independent Study-Practicum. (3 Credits)

Field experiences designed to provide students with supervised practical application of family studies theory and research. Practicum placements must be approved, supervised, and evaluated in collaboration with a designated faculty advisor.

FS 600. Research Methods in Family Studies. (3 Credits)

Study of the methods and techniques of research used in the social and behavioral sciences and their related disciplines with a specific emphasis on research in family studies. Attention is given to the fundamentals of research: comprehension and critique of research literature, theoretical and practical basis of research,problem identification, research design, causal inference, sampling, measurement, data collection, hypothesis testing, and ethics in research.

FS 601. Applied Statistics in Family Studies. (3 Credits)

An examination of the use of quantitative statistical methods in family studies research, including important principles, theories, and Strategies for conducting univariate, bivariate, and multivariate statistical analyses. The course includes an introduction to the use and interpretation of SPSS®. Data analyses include descriptive statistics. Pearson r correlations, t-tests, and ANOVA. An undergraduate course in statistics is a prerequisite.

FS 602. Family Theories. (3 Credits)

An examination of the current theories and models used in family research and theory development. The course includes an evaluation of the strengths and limitations of each theory and focuses on the application of theoretical concepts in explaining family life.

FS 604. Family and Social Policy. (3 Credits)

An overview of theoretical and substantive issues related to the development and implementation of family policies. Emphasis is given to the connections among family policies, social welfare, family well-being, and political culture.

FS 605. Contemporary Topics in Family Studies. (3 Credits)

This course surveys contemporary issues in family studies. Topics will be examined by developing a theoretical understanding of the issue and will foster both writing and critical inquiry skills related to the issue. May be repeated for up to six credit hours.

FS 606. Family Problems and Methods of Intervention. (3 Credits)

The course focuses on the major social and family problems contemporary families face, such as poverty, violence, substance abuse, divorce, stepfamilies, and care of dependent elders. An emphasis is placed on family strengths and resiliency as well as methods of intervention that can help families withstand and overcome difficulties.

FS 695. Thesis. (3-6 Credits)

Students completing the thesis option will develop a research problem or question, review relevant literature, collect and analyze data, and compose a defensible thesis. Theses must be approved by and completed under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Students completing the thesis option will take FS 695 twice for three credit hours each time.

FS 698. Comprehensive Examination. (0 Credits)

Orientation to the administration of a written comprehensive examination for the M.S. in Family Studies. The course is to be taken in the last term in which a non-thesis option student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of "S' indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "S" is required for graduation; may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.

FS 699. Thesis Defense. (0 Credits)

Orientation to and administration of a thesis defense for the M.S. in Family Studies. The course is to be taken in the last term in which a thesis option student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of ”S” indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of ”U” for unsatisfactory performance will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of ”S” is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.