HI - History (HI)

HI 511. American Material Culture. (3 Credits)

Introduces student to the study of material culture. The course examines the interpretation, preservation, and presentation of artifacts and architecture. Examines the cultural and social connections objects have with those who use them.

HI 512. Collections Management. (3 Credits)

Collections Management will provide students with the knowledge and skills to maintain and preserve a museum collection. Students will learn museum standard collections management procedures including collections processing, inventory, cataloging, proper numbering and marking of museum objects, and care and handling of different types of artifacts.

HI 513. Historical Archeology. (3 Credits)

This course will introduce students to historical archeology. Students will learn research and fieldwork methods, as well as methods for analysis and interpretation of objects.

HI 514. Historic Preservation: Fieldwork Methods. (3 Credits)

Students will gain experience in researching, assessing, and mapping historic sites and structures. Students will examine traditional methods of construction and will examine how change over time impacts sites and structures.

Course Fees: $50

HI 515. Digital Collections Management. (3 Credits)

Students will understand the purpose and structure of metadata standards commonly used in the cataloging and management of public history collections. Students will investigate relative strengths and weaknesses of various data management solutions and will create electronic resource records in an online collection management system.

HI 516. History of American Architecture. (3 Credits)

Introduces students to the basic framework and timeline of American architectural history from prehistory to contemporary America. Examines residential commercial, and ecclesiastical architecture. Also examines the role society and culture play in the development of architectural styles.

HI 517. History of Rome. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the history of ancient Rome from Romulus to Constantine (8th c. BC - early 4th c. AD). The course examines the rise of Roman rule in Italy and the ancient Mediterranean, the development of republican government, the rise of autocracy under the Caesars, and the collapse of the Western Roman Empire due to the rise of Christianity and outside by hostile invaders. Special attention will be given to modern interpretations of Roman history and the intersection of ancient history and modern culture.

HI 521. Renaissance and Reformation. (3 Credits)

A balanced survey of Early Modern Europe, 1450-1648, with emphasis on the Italian and Northern Renaissances, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, overseas expansion, rise of royal absolutism, and the scientific revolution.

HI 522. Age of Discovery. (3 Credits)

An examination of European exploration, expansion, and conquest from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.

HI 523. Europe: From Rebirth to Revolution, 1350-1815. (3 Credits)

An examination of Europe from the Renaissance through the French Revolution with emphasis on cultural, social, and political transformation.

HI 524. European Popular Culture, 1500-1800. (3 Credits)

This course explores the lives of common people of the early-modern period (1500-1800) and how they made sense of the world. It seeks to uncover not only what people thought, but how they thought, and how they expressed such thought in behavior. Topics studied include family and community structure, poverty, criminality and violence, oral traditions, popular religion, rituals, popular protest and rebellion, witchcraft and vampires, the development of manners, as well as the impact that the political, economic, social, and intellectual changes of the period had on popular culture.

HI 525. The Revolutionary Age, 1789-1848. (3 Credits)

The origin and course of the French Revolution, the European reaction, the Napoleonic period in Europe and the Western Hemisphere, the rise of industrialism and Romanticism.

HI 527. Nineteenth Century European History, 1815-1914. (3 Credits)

The rise of modern Europe 1815 to 1914. The spread of liberalism, nationalism, and democratic forces; the industrial revolution and the resulting imperialistic and democratic rivalries among the great powers.

HI 529. Twentieth Century European History, 1914-Present. (3 Credits)

Recent and contemporary Europe 1914 to present. The two world wars, decline of colonialism, the rise of new great powers, and conflicting ideologies.

HI 530. English Constitutional History. (3 Credits)

A study of the development of the English Constitution from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present. Also listed as PS 530 but creditable only in field for which registered.

HI 533. History of Balkans. (3 Credits)

A survey of Balkan history from the middle ages to the present with emphasis on the place of the Balkans in the international systems of the Mediterranean and European regions, the rise of modern national movements, ethnic cultures and cooperation, and the life of the modern Balkan states.

HI 538. History of the Caribbean. (3 Credits)

An in-depth study of the major Caribbean countries and of the Lesser Antillian colonies from the colonial period to the present, with special emphasis on the institution of slavery, cultural differentials, dictatorship, the role of the United States, nationalism, and communism.

HI 542. History of Samurai. (3 Credits)

This course examines the history of Japan¿s feudalism and samurai culture from the 6th century to the mid 19th century. It analyzes Japan¿s unique political and social system ruled by the warrior class, and the impact of samurai culture in Japanese religions and art.

HI 543. History of Geisha and Asian Women Through Film. (3 Credits)

This course will examine how Confucian ideology in East Asia restricted women¿s status in the traditional East Asian society, how modernization liberated women, how women participated in the militarism in Asia, how A-bomb and Occupation changed women¿s lives in post war Asia, and how revolution in China changed women¿s lives from the 1930s to contemporary. The course will also explore the several themes of Asian women¿s position in the 21st century by focusing on the contemporary family life in Asia, Asian women immigrants to the United States, and life of Geisha today.

HI 544. History of the Middle East. (3 Credits)

A study of the history, cultures, and contemporary problems of the Middle East.

HI 546. History of Africa. (3 Credits)

Traces the history of Africa from earliest times to the present, with emphasis on the period since the mid-nineteenth century.

HI 548. The History of World War II. (3 Credits)

The origins, course, and consequences of the second world war.

HI 550. United States Colonial History. (3 Credits)

A study of the political, economic, social, and religious development of the American colonies, with particular attention paid to the British mainland colonies.

HI 551. American Revolution and United States Early Republic, 1763-1800. (3 Credits)

A study of the origins, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution from the middle of the 18th century to the ratification of the federal Constitution.

HI 552. The Middle Period of United States History, 1800-1848. (3 Credits)

A study of the beginnings of the American Republic, its formative years, and its development up to the beginnings of the nation¿s sectional crisis.

HI 553. Civil War and Reconstruction. (3 Credits)

An intensive study of the development of sectionalism and of the period of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HI 554. United States History, 1877-1919. (3 Credits)

A study of United States history from the end of Reconstruction through World War I.

HI 555. United States History, 1920-1945. (3 Credits)

A study of United States history from 1920 through World War II.

HI 556. History of the United States Since World War II. (3 Credits)

The United States since World War II, with emphasis on the origins and development of the Cold War, including Korea and Vietnam, domestic social, cultural, and political movements in the 1950s and 1960s, the Age of Reagan, and the influence of the "Baby Boomer" generation in the 20th and 21st centuries.

HI 560. Cold War, 1945-1991. (3 Credits)

An examination of the causes, conduct, and consequences of the Cold War in a global context.

HI 561. History of the South. (3 Credits)

An advanced survey of political, economic, and social developments in Southern history from the 17th century "pre-South" to the Sunbelt of the 21st, with emphasis on regional and cultural identity, and the interaction of the South in the broader history of the United States.

HI 562. History of Mexico. (3 Credits)

An examination of native society, conquest, colonial Mexico, the wars for independence, the revolution, and Mexico since the revolution.

HI 567. History of the West. (3 Credits)

Relation of westward movement to the development of the United States; factors responsible for and composition of various segments of the general movements; problems of frontier and the influence of the frontier on American institutions.

HI 570. History of Asian Religions. (3 Credits)

This course examines both the historical development and current content of the religious and philosophical traditions of Asia with special emphasis on Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism. The course covers Japan, China, India, Tibet, other parts of Southeast Asia and East Asia. For each of these traditions, we will consider its history and mythology, the great themes and ideas which have shaped the worlds of meaning for the followers, and the ways of worshipping and achieving the good life, individually and socially.

HI 576. Oral History. (3 Credits)

Exposes students to the use of oral history as a research technique and provides experience in conducting professionally acceptable oral history interviews.

HI 579. History of Religion in the United States. (3 Credits)

A nonsectarian survey of religion in United States history from the 17th century to the 21st, including, but not limited to, origins, revivalism, Catholicism, the rise of denominationalism in American Protestantism. civil religion, and the emergence of the holiness and charismatic movements.

HI 580. Digital History. (3 Credits)

The current and potential impact of digital media on the theory and practice of history. Explores a range of production of new media history resources, including both practical work on project management and design.

HI 584. Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course concerning the ¿Demarcation Question¿ ¿ where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experience, UFOs and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies.

HI 585. U.S History Through Film. (3 Credits)

This course will examine the uses of film for exploring the past, critique history as it is depicted in movies, and explore how cinematic depictions of the past have been shaped by the era in which they were made.

HI 590. Special Topics. (3 Credits)

One or more carefully selected historical topics.

HI 591. Internship Practicum. (3 Credits)

Open to graduate students in the Department of History and Political Science on approval of the department chair. Professional work situations in which the skills and knowledge appropriate to the historical profession can be practiced under departmental supervision and evaluation.

HI 599. Independent Study-Practicum. (3 Credits)

Independent study, research, or special field experience under departmental supervision.

HI 603. Teaching Methodology. (3 Credits)

Introduction to the theory and practice of teaching history. Selected readings on pedagogical theory and current research on teaching and learning; emphasis on classroom application. Hands-on exercises in course design, assignment and test preparation, grading and assessment, lecturing, leading discussion, and the use of technology to enhance learning. Normally limited to graduate students in History; other graduate students with departmental approval.

HI 605. Historiography and Methodology. (3 Credits)

A study of the writing and philosophy of history, investigative techniques, and the mechanics of historical research and documentation.

HI 611. Seminar in U.S. History to 1877. (3 Credits)

Research and writing based seminar on topics in American history through the end of Reconstruction with emphasis upon analysis and interpretation. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

HI 612. Seminar in U.S. History Since 1877. (3 Credits)

Research and writing based seminar on topics in American history since the end of Reconstruction with emphasis upon analysis and interpreation. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

HI 621. Seminar in World History to 1815. (3 Credits)

Research and writing based seminar on topics in World history to 1815 with emphasis upon analysis and interpretation. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

HI 622. Seminar in World History Since 1815. (3 Credits)

Research and writing based seminar on topics in World history since 1815 with emphasis upon analysis and interpretation. May be repeated for credit with a change in topic.

HI 640. Directed Research and Study. (3 Credits)

Requires a major research and writing project in a n appropriate subject matter area. May be repeated for credit as topics will vary.

HI 665. Public History. (3 Credits)

Introduces students to the theories and methodologies that are fundamental to the practice of public history. Students will engage in collaborative projects, both within the community and state-wide. Students will also focus on developing leadership skills and presentation skills.

Course Fees: $40

HI 670. Historic Preservation and Cultural Resource Management. (3 Credits)

The identification, preservation, and maintenance of historic sites and artifacts. Explores regulatory policies and procedures employed by federal, state, and local agencies in the work of identifying, evaluating, recording, preserving, and managing the historical, architectural, and cultural resources of the United States.

Course Fees: $30

HI 671. Historical Administration. (3 Credits)

History and philosophy of museums, especially historical museums; organization and operation; planning exhibits; educational activities; and public relations. The nature of archives; various types of records; arranging and processing archives; restoring and protecting records; archival institutions, policies, and procedures.

Course Fees: $30

HI 679. Public History Internship. (3 Credits)

Internship with a public or private historical agency or institution of regional or national significance. Enrollment limited to students in the Master of Arts in History program with an emphasis in Public History.

HI 690. Special Topics in History. (3 Credits)

A variety of topics will be offered under the course number and title as the need arises. Course may be repeated for credit as different topics in history are offered.

HI 695. Thesis. (3-6 Credits)

Selection of a research topic, collection and analysis of primary and secondary historical sources, composition of and public defense of a thesis.

HI 697. Public History Portfolio. (0 Credits)

Students will compile a portfolio based on their work in the public history program. Students will give a formal presentation on their portfolio during their final semester. A grade of "S" indicating satisfactory performance of a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "IP" indicating incomplete in progress can also be assigned.

HI 698. Comprehensive Examination. (0 Credits)

Orientation to and administration of a written comprehensive examination for the MA in History program. A non-credit course required of all candidates for the non-thesis option. The course is to be taken in the last term in which the student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of "S" indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "S" is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Prerequisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.

HI 699. Thesis Defense. (0 Credits)

Orientation to and administration of an oral examination for the MA in History program. A non-credit course required of all candidates for the thesis option. The course is to be taken in the last term in which the student is expected to complete all other program requirements. A grade of "S" indicating satisfactory performance or a grade of "U" for unsatisfactory will be recorded on the transcript. A grade of "S" is required for graduation; the course may be repeated once. Pre-requisite: student must have completed all other program requirements or be enrolled in the last course for program completion.