CJ - Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 199. Service Learning. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to Service Learning through the integration of academic learning about local, national, and global issues with service work addressing those concerns. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

CJ 250. Introduction to Criminal Justice. (3 Credits)

A survey of the elements of the criminal justice system including the nature and definition of criminal law, the functions of the police, courts and corrections as subsystems and their interrelationship within the total system. (Fall, Spring)

CJ 255. Police Organizations and Community Relations. (3 Credits)

A study of the organization and functions of police agencies, with special reference to state and local agencies and community relations. (Spring)

CJ 285. Corections. (3 Credits)

An examination of intrafamily physical, sexual, and emotional abuse: its causes, its consequences, its extent and the manner in which social control agencies have responded to it.

CJ 295. Criminal Law. (3 Credits)

A study of the historical and philosophical concepts of law, preserving life and property, offense against person and property, and common offense and defense to criminal acts. (Fall)

CJ 306. Juvenile Delinquency. (3 Credits)

An analysis of the nature, causes, and extent of juvenile delinquency; and an evaluation of preventive programs. Also listed as SO 306.

CJ 320. Current Issues in Security and Emergency Management. (3 Credits)

To be effective in the field of Security and Emergency Management, one must have mastery and understanding of the contemporary management principles and strategies of homeland security and emergency management operations. Additionally, one must also stay abreast of emerging trends, challenges, practices, and problems within the profession and academic discipline. Those are the areas we will explore in this course. Also listed as SEM 320 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Summer – on sufficient demand)

CJ 323. Criminology. (3 Credits)

A study of crime and criminal behavior in American society, with special emphasis on the individual, group trends, and theories concerning treatment. Also listed as SO 323. (Fall)

CJ 326. Professional Ethics and Legal Liabilities. (3 Credits)

An examination of standards and principles through which professional misconduct is recognized in an emerging system of ethics and law applicable to criminal justice practitioners. (Fall)

CJ 330. Family Violence. (3 Credits)

An examination of intrafamily physical, sexual, and emotional abuse: its causes, its consequences, its extent and the manner in which social control agencies have responded to it. Also listed as WS 330 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Spring)

CJ 336. Community-Based Corrections. (3 Credits)

Organization of systems of aftercare treatment of juvenile and adult offenders released under probation and parole.

CJ 345. The Justice System: Race, Color, Gender. (3 Credits)

This course will explore issues related to race, class, gender and justice. Law in the United States has been used to define people's racial and ethnic identity, to hold people in bondage and to free them, to deny and protect basic rights, to segregate and to integrate. In addition, through the definition and prosecution of criminal offenses, law has been an agent both of oppression and protection. We will consider the complex role of law as it relates to race, class and gender.

CJ 350. Interagency Cooperation. (3 Credits)

Interagency cooperation within the US federal system including the nature, role, function, and jurisdiction of agencies and how they work together in doing the business of government in the emergency management, homeland security, and law enforcement realm. Also listed as PS 350 and SEM 350 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall - even years - with sufficient demand)

CJ 359. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

CJ 369. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

CJ 389. On-Campus Internship. (3 Credits)

CJ 390. Substance Abuse. (3 Credits)

A comprehensive study concerning the historical, social, and legal aspects of substance abuse. This course explores the impact of substance abuse on criminal behavior, criminal justice personnel, and the community. (Fall)

CJ 399. Departmental Service Learning. (1-6 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to integrate academic learning about vital service issues within a specific discipline with service work addressing those issues. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

CJ 405. Criminal Investigation. (3 Credits)

Investigation, methodology, relations of the detective with other police divisions, modus operandi, evidence development, source of information, interview, interrogation, surveillance, and courtroom testimony. (Fall)

CJ 406. Forensic Investigation. (3 Credits)

An examination of modern forensic science principles and techniques as applied to the detection, collection, preservation and analysis of crime scene evidence. Course topics will include but are not limited to fingerprints, serological evidence, trace evidence, and other evidentiary items.

Course Fees: $30

CJ 406L. Forensic Investigation Lab. (1 Credit)

Applied field experience in crime scene documentation. evidence collection/storage, evidence processing, and evidence transportation. Topics include fingerprint, trace, blood, and firearm/ballistic evidence. Current registration of CJ 406.

Course Fees: $30

CJ 410. Terrorism and Terrorist Operations. (3 Credits)

The history, methods, and philosophy of terrorism are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on extremism as a foundation for terrorist behavior, types of terrorism, and how governments and law enforcement agencies respond to terrorism. Case studies of terrorist activities and implications for emergency response are highlighted. Also listed as SEM 410 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring)

CJ 413. Pub Org/Bureaucratic Theory. (3 Credits)

This course is a study of the many theories that attempt to explain how organizations and the people in them will behave in varying organizational structures, cultures, and environments. Special attention is given to the role of democratic accountability, justice, and fairness. Also listed as PS 413 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

CJ 415. Ethics in Admin Leadership. (3 Credits)

This course examines major ethical issues that arise in public administration. Theoretical justification and application for ethical problems that arise in leadership positions will be explored. Also listed as PHL 415 and PS 415 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring)

CJ 418. Regulating Vice In American Cities. (3 Credits)

An examination of the challenges posed by culture war movements and how they clash with religious institutions, interest group forces, electoral politics, and governance in American communities. Students will study the diverse sets of policies adopted by cities to curb vice and deal with it consequences. Students will become familiar with the various obstacles faced by researchers and lawmakers in their attempts to better understand public policy that deals with morality politics.

CJ 420. International Law Enforcement and Emergency Management. (3 Credits)

Introduction and overview of Law Enforcement and Emergency Response in an international or comparative context. Exploration of trends within the areas of transnational crime, regional and global crisis intervention as well as the international structures and functions created to deal with these issues. Analysis of current trends, operations, practices and emerging issues within the field. Includes a required short-term study abroad experience (additional cost) where students will get a hands-on experience within the international law enforcement and emergency response environment. Also listed as SEM 420 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Fall, odd-years – with sufficient demand)

CJ 430. Criminal Evidence. (3 Credits)

An examination of the basic principles of evidence including but not limited to testimonial and physical evidence used in the prosecution of criminal cases. (Fall)

CJ 431. Principles of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis. (3 Credits)

In addition to the history of bloodstain pattern identification, instruction will be focused on the proper recognition of bloodstain pattern identification and how the findings choreograph within crime scene reconstruction within a wide range of crime scene scenarios. Prerequisites: CJ 250, CJ 406, CJ 406L and current registration in CJ 431L.

CJ 431L. Principles of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis Lab. (1 Credit)

Experimenttion of blood flight behavior from differeing effects of motion and force utilizing simulated blood (physically similar spatter training blood) on a number of common bloodstain pattern crime scene targets will be conducted firsthand in a group work setting. The introduction of bloodstain pattern identification tools will be emphasized to include, but not limited to the following: Presumptive Field Test kits (Luminal, Bluestar, Hexagon OBTI [human blood verifier], and Phenolphthalein), Supersticks, and trajectory string kits. Instruction will be focused on the proper recognition of bloodstain patterns, determination of bloodstain pattern impact angles, defining the area of origin, target surface influence, and point of convergence. prerequisites: CJ 250, CJ 406, CJ 406L, and current registration of CJ 431.

Course Fees: $30

CJ 432. Crime Scene Reconstruction. (3 Credits)

This course culminates the utilization and application of the knowledge of the physics of evidence, the interpretation of bloodstain pattern identification, fingerprint and ballistic evidence, and other forensically based evidence in crime scenes into re-creating the crime scene for purposes of producing investigative leads in identifying the perpetrator's method of operation. Prerequisites: CJ 406, CJ 406L, CJ 431, CJ 431L. (Spring)

CJ 433. Evidence Management. (3 Credits)

Emphasis will be focused on learning policy development that focuses on organizational structure, documentation, safety, security, storage, evidence handling procedures, audits, and evidence purging. Prerequisites: CJ 250, CJ 406, and CJ 406L.

CJ 434. Criminal Procedure. (3 Credits)

Examines the procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders. Topics include the concepts of evidence sufficiency, standards of proof, due process, and constitutional safeguards. (Spring)

CJ 440W. Research Methods in Criminal Justice. (3 Credits)

Examines the methodologies employed by criminal justice researchers and professionals. Prerequisite: CJ 323. (Fall)

CJ 441. Research Practicum in Criminal Justice. (3 Credits)

Practical application of criminal justice analysis and methods conducting criminal justice research projects. Includes selection of methods and analytical techniques, data collection, and report writing. Prerequisites: CJ 323, CJ 440W, and MA 110 or higher. (Spring)

CJ 450. Criminal Justice, Public Policy and Administration. (3 Credits)

Familiarizes students with the justification and logic of selected crime control policies and assess their effectiveness. The course also explores the effect of policies on agency functions. Prerequisite: CJ 323.

CJ 480. Psychological Dimensions of Criminal Justice Practice. (3 Credits)

Examines the psychological dimensions of criminal justice practice. Topics include the psychology of criminal conduct, the science of forensic profiling, the interviewing and interrogation of suspects, witnesses and victims, the interpersonal relationships among criminal justice professionals and members of the public, and other timely selected topics. (Spring)

CJ 491. Special Topics. (3 Credits)

This course surveys a contemporary justice issue. Topics will be treated by developing a theoretical understanding of the issue, and will foster both writing and critical inquiry skills. Course may be substituted for one upper-level elective in criminal justice. (Offered upon sufficient demand)

CJ 492. Advanced Methods. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and how this statistical technique is used in social science research. Also listed as PS 492 but creditable only in field for which registered. Prerequisite: PS 301 or CJ 441. (Offered upon sufficient demand)

CJ 493. Studies in Family Justice. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course with a focus on support services for victims and survivors of rape, domestic violence, elder abuse, sexual assault and child abuse. After the completion of this course students will be eligible to apply for an internship with One Place of the Shoals, INC. One Place is a centralized collaborative community effort which provides co-located and coordinated victim services under one roof.

CJ 494. Internship in Family Justice. (3 Credits)

The internships a continuation of CJ 493 and will place the intern at One Place of the Shoals, Inc. where the student will spend a minimum of 150 hours during the semester under joint supervision of the agency and the university. The student will aid in providing support to victims by assisting in casework with victim service providers, law enforcement agencies and attorneys. Prerequisite: CJ 493.

CJ 495. Internship in Criminal Justice. (3 Credits)

Supervised work experience with a criminal justice agency in which the student spends a minimum of 150 hours during the term under joint supervision of the agency and the University. There will be four meeting sessions during the internship period designed to evaluate and discuss the internship experience. Prerequisites: junior and senior criminal justice majors and department chair approval.

CJ 499. independent Study-Practicum. (3 Credits)

Open to senior majors on approval of the department chair. Provides for independent study, research, or practical experiences under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. May be repeated for credit pending department chair approval. (Fall, Spring, Summer)