PHL - Philosophy (PHL)

PHL 1XX. Philosophy Elective. (1-3 Credits)

PHL 199. Service Learning. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to Service Learning through the integration of academic learning about local, national, and global issues with service work addressing those concerns. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

PHL 201. Introduction to Philosophy. (3 Credits)

An examination of humanity's quest for wisdom. Emphasis is placed on the ideas, methodologies, and problems of classic and contemporary philosophy. Topics of study include the nature of human agency and freedom, how meaning and value are derived and justified, threats to a meaningful life, and how these threats might be ameliorated.

PHL 201H. Introduction to Philosophy - Honors. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to philosophy that provides a rigorous intellectual environ¬ment for honors students. The course balances a generally historical approach to the philosophical tradition of the West with a topical treatment of important aspects of philosophy such as logic, metaphysics, epistemol¬ogy, ethics, politics, esthetics, and religion.

PHL 202. Logic. (3 Credits)

A study of the methodology of reasoning. Special attention given to understanding argument structure, recognizing various fallacies, and constructing good arguments.

PHL 205. Ethics. (3 Credits)

A study of the nature of morality. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of traditional ethical theories and their application to contemporary moral problems.

PHL 250. Business Ethics. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the nature of business ethics. We will begin by examining the importance of rational justification in the establishment of ethical belief and how the creation of a rationally informed moral point of view can help us to navigate the various moral challenges encountered in business practices. Specifically, we will explore the nature of ethical justification by looking at various philosophical attempts to ground ethical thought (e.g. Utilitarianism, Social Contract Theory, Deontology, and Virtue Ethics). Once we have addressed the nature of ethical justification sufficiently, we will examine specific issues in business ethics. This will include a detailed look at several moral issues: justice and economic distribution, the nature of corporate moral agency and responsibility, civil liberties in the workplace, workplace privacy and autonomy, working conditions, ethical choices in the workplace (e.g. bribes, loyalties, whistleblowing), discrimination and harassment, consumers and truth telling, and environmental concerns. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating these issues critically, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of various positions and exploring how insights from each of these might help us to address the ethical problems we encounter.

PHL 303. Philosophy of Religion. (3 Credits)

A philosophical examination of religion. Topics covered include arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of religious experiences, the problem of evil, characteristics of divine nature religious belief and moral justification, and the relationship between faith and knowledge. Also listed as RE 303 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PHL 331. History of Western Philosophy I. (3 Credits)

A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. Also listed as HI 331 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 332. History of Western Philosophy II. (3 Credits)

A survey of major philosophers and philosophical concepts from the Renaissance to the present. Also listed as HI 332 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 340. Metaphysics. (3 Credits)

A study of the nature of reality. Topics of study may include Time, Identity, Mind, and Free Will. The course highlights both classic and contemporary approaches to these topics. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 359. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

PHL 369. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

PHL 389. On-Campus Internship. (3 Credits)

PHL 399. Departmental Service Learning. (1-6 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to integrate academic learning about vital service issues within a specific discipline with service work addressing those issues. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

PHL 415. Ethics in Administrative Leadership. (3 Credits)

This course examines major ethical issues that arise in public administration. Theoretical justification and application for ethical problems that arise in leadership positions will be explored. The course will be offered in the Spring of even numbered years.

PHL 430. Existentialism. (3 Credits)

This course examines various philosophical theories of Existentialism. It explores the 19th Century response to German Idealism (particularly Hegel) in the thought of Soren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Friedrich Nietzsche. From there, we explore the development of ideas in the works of Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and the religious thought of Martin Buber. While this approach highlights a historical approach to the tradition, we will also give specific attention to the significant themes and issues that unify the diverse thinkers. In particular, the course explores what it means to live authentically, the nature of subjectivity, the human condition as it relates to anxiety, despair, boredom, freedom, alienation, and the human confrontation with nothingness, nihilism, and absurdity. Also listed as RE 430 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

PHL 450. Contemporary Political Philosophy. (3 Credits)

A study of current themes and trends within contemporary political philosophy. Topics of study may include issues of justice, liberty, equality, alienation, recognition, and the politics of difference. Readings are often selected from both the Analytic and Continental philosophical traditions. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 484. Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course concerning the ¿Demarcation Question¿¿where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including: Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experiences, UFO¿s and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age Movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies. Also listed as HI 484 and RE 484 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 490. Special Topics. (1-3 Credits)

A study of one or more carefully selected topics in philosophy. The length of time and amount of study will determine the amount of credit earned. (Offered on sufficient demand)

PHL 499. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

Open to students on approval of the department chair. Provides for independent study or research under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. Students may complete up to six hours of independent study; exceptions may be made with departmental approval. (Offered on sufficient demand)