EN - English (EN)

EN 099. Basic English. (3 Credits)

A noncredit course in basic grammar and composition required of all students with scores of 15 or below on the ACT English Subtest. Counts as three semester hours in determining hour load. Grading is S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). On a grade of U the student may repeat the course; on a grade of S the student proceeds to enrollment in English 111. English 099 may be repeated only once; after the second term in English 099 the student, no matter what the grade, must proceed to enrollment in English 111. (Fall, Spring)

EN 111. First-Year Composition I. (3 Credits)

An introduction to expository writing, rhetoric, and reading. The acquisition of the basic skills in standard English is stressed. Grades in EN 111 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). Students receiving a grade of NC must repeat the course. (See Department of English narrative) (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 111H. First-Year Composition Honors I. (3 Credits)

Accelerated training in expository writing and reading taken in lieu of English 111 by superior freshman students selected on the basis of placement tests. Grades in EN 111H are A, B, C, NC (no credit). (See Department of English narrative) Students receiving a grade of NC in English 111H must enroll in the regular Freshman English sequence, beginning with English 111. (Fall)

EN 112. First Year Composition II. (3 Credits)

A continuation of training in expository writing and reading, stressing the acquisition of higher-level skills in standard English and the introduction to the basic tools and processes of academic research. Grades in EN 112 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). Students receiving a grade of NC must repeat the course. (see Department of English narrative) Prerequisite: EN 111. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 112H. First-Year Composition Honors II. (3 Credits)

A continuation of the accelerated training begun in English 111H, stressing the development of advanced skills in several modes of composition as well as the acquisition and development of skills in academic research. Grades in EN 112H are A, B, C, NC (no credit). (See Department of English narrative) Students receiving a grade of NC in English 112H complete the sequence by enrolling in English 112. Prerequisite: EN 111H. (Spring)

EN 199. Service Learning. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to Service Learning through the integration of academic learning about local, national, and global issues with service work addressing those concerns. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

EN 201. Advanced Critical Reading. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in the advanced skills and techniques used to recognize details and access meaning in a variety of academic and professional texts from a variety of discourses.

EN 211. Survey of British Literature. (3 Credits)

The development of English literature as an expression of English culture from Beowulf through Neoclassicism. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Fall, odd-numbered years; Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 211H. Honors Survey of British Literature. (3 Credits)

The development of English literature as an expression of English culture from Beowulf through Neoclassicism. Prerequisite: 112H.

EN 212. Survey of British Literature. (3 Credits)

A continuation of English 211 from the Pre-Romantics to the present. Recommended in sequence. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Spring, even-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 212H. Honors Survey of British Literature. (3 Credits)

A continuation of English 211H from the Pre-Romantics to the present. Recommended in sequence. Prerequisite: 112H.

EN 221. American Literature through Whitman. (3 Credits)

Major American poets and prose writers of the period. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Fall, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 221H. Honors American Literature through Whitman. (3 Credits)

An in-depth study of major American poets and prose writers of the period. Prerequisite: 112H.

EN 222. American Literature from Whitman to the Present. (3 Credits)

Major American poets and prose writers of the period. Recommended in sequence. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Spring, even-numbered years; Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 222H. Honors American Literature for Whitman to the Present. (3 Credits)

An in-depth study of major American poets and prose writers of the period. Recommended in sequence. Prerequisite: EN 112H.

EN 231. Literature of the World I. (3 Credits)

A survey of selections from the great literature of the world, covering major writers of the ancient world to 1650. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 231H. Honors Literature of the World I. (3 Credits)

An intensive survey of the literature of the world from antiquity to 1650. In-depth reading in the works of selected authors will be required and written reports and/or research projects will be expected of each student. Prerequisite: EN 112H or departmental approval. (Fall)

EN 232. Literature of the World II. (3 Credits)

A study of the great works of the world literature, covering major writers from 1650 to the modern era. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 112H. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 232H. Honors Literature of the World II. (3 Credits)

An intensive study of the literature of the world from 1650 to the modern age. In-depth reading of the works of selected authors will be required and written reports and/or research projects will be expected of each student. (Spring)

EN 255. Creative Writing Appreciation. (3 Credits)

A study of the contemporary fine art of creative writing by means of spoken word readings of poetry and fiction, live and recorded readings by published literary writers, expert demonstrations of graphic novels with students writing and performing in one genre. (Fall, Spring)

EN 298. Special Topics in Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in a period, area of interest, or selected authors in literature. Prerequisite: EN 112 or EN 112H.

EN 303. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 304. Honors Seminar-Literature. (3 Credits)

A seminar for students in the honors sequence in English. Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of literature. Prerequisite: 12 hours of honors courses in English or departmental approval. (Fall)

EN 305. African-American Women Writers. (3 Credits)

An examination of the writings of African-American women beginning with the slave narrative and ending with contemporary poetry, fiction, and drama. Also listed as WS 305 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 306. Introduction to English Linguistics. (3 Credits)

Introduction to concepts of English linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, acquisition, and variation. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 307. Approaches to Film Studies. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the study of film, including analysis of film language--cinematography, editing, sound, and mise-en-scene--as well as narrative construction. Films are drawn from various national cinemas, representing diverse styles, periods, and genres. (Fall, Spring).

EN 308. Studies in Folklore. (3 Credits)

A study of the sources, backgrounds, and forms of folklore. Introduction to the field. Emphasis is given to research methods and fieldwork. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 309. Film Theory and Criticisms. (3 Credits)

An introduction to film theory and criticism, focusing on the theorists, movements, and critical practices in film studies. (Spring)

EN 310W. Advanced Composition. (3 Credits)

Practice in expository writing beyond that offered by Freshman Composition.

EN 315. History of Film. (3 Credits)

The historical development of the motion picture and television film as an art form from earliest stages to the present, including the technical, social, economic, and cultural factors influencing development, and using films from the periods and genres. (Spring)

EN 318. Genre Studies in American Literature. (3 Credits)

This course introduces students to the defining characteristics and evolution of literary genre other than the novel over the course of a discrete time period. Possible genres include poetry, drama, short stories, life writing, and graphic novels. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 323. Literature for Young Adults. (3 Credits)

Literature suitable for instructional and recreational use by middle school/junior high school and high school students.Prerequisite: ABI/FBI Background Clearance and EN 310W.

EN 324. The Oral Tradition. (3 Credits)

An examination of the structure, genres, and differing attitudes of written and oral literature as well as those periods in literary history in which oral literature has flourished. (Spring, odd-numbered years; Summer even-numbered years)

EN 325. British Romantic Literature. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in the works of major authors of the Romantic period.

EN 326. Victorian Literature. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in the works of major authors of the Victorian period.

EN 327. Early Twentieth Century British Literature. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in the works of major authors from 1890 - 1950.

EN 331. Contemporary Global Literature. (3 Credits)

A study of the changing forms and themes of literature written outside of Britain and the U.S. from 1950 to the present. Texts not originally written in English will be studied in translation.

EN 333. Images of Women in Literature. (3 Credits)

An examination of images of women in literature drawn primarily from the works of women writers in English and American literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; an introduction to feminist criticism. Also listed as WS 333 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 339W. Technical Writing. (3 Credits)

Training in such writing as may be necessary in certain professional and scientific fields. Emphasis is placed on writing of memoranda, letters, technical reports, and research reports. Prerequisite: EN 310W.

EN 350. The Bible as Literature. (3 Credits)

A secular, critical, and historical study of the multiple books of the Bible as literary works, with attention to the wide range of narratives. themes. and figurative images they contain. The course analyzes biblical literature in the context of other literature and mythology.

EN 355W. Genres in Creative Writing. (3 Credits)

A workshop format introducing the fundamentals of craft and editing in the basic genres of literary short fiction, poetry, drama, and creative non-fiction.

EN 359. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

EN 360. Literary Criticism. (3 Credits)

Major critical trends in literary theory, with emphasis on criticism since 1965, including feminist, Marxist, structuralist and deconstructive approaches to literature. Exploration on these theories and analysis of selected works of literature. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 369. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

EN 371. English Drama. (3 Credits)

English Drama from its sources through the nineteenth century, excluding Shakespeare. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 383W. Screenplay Fundamentals. (3 Credits)

Workshops in the craft’s most effective conventions and an introduction to constructing affective visual narratives. Exercises guide to mastery of essentials, which culminate in conceptualizing and composing an authentic work. Course fee: $30.00. (Fall, Spring)

EN 389. On-Campus Internship. (3 Credits)

EN 391. Film Authors. (3 Credits)

An intense study of the films of a major filmmaker or group of filmmakers, with an emphasis on how their work contributed to the development of the art of the film. Students will become engaged with directors from around the world who, based on their body of work, help one see the cultural, historical, and social significance of their works in cinematic history. (Spring even-numbered years)

EN 392. Film Genres. (3 Credits)

The course focuses on a particular film style or genre, with particular emphasis on genre study. Sample topics might include Film Comedy; Science Fiction; The Western; Avant-Garde Film; Documentary film; German Expressionism; Neorealism. (Fall odd-numbered years)

EN 394. Perspectives in European Film. (3 Credits)

A survey of selected or individual European cinemas with a focus on major narrative films and the cultural and historical contexts from which they derive. (Fall even-numbered years).

EN 395. World Cinema. (3 Credits)

A survey of key tendencies in international cinema from the silent era to the present day. (Offered on sufficient demand).

EN 396W. Writing about Film. (3 Credits)

An introduction to the instruction and practice in the techniques of writing essays about film. Writing assignments might include reviews, research papers, theoretical inquiries, scholarly articles, or critical analyses. (Fall odd-numbered years).

EN 399. Departmental Service Learning. (1-6 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to integrate academic learning about vital service issues within a specific discipline with service work addressing those issues. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

EN 401. Chaucer. (3 Credits)

The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and most of the minor poems. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 402. Milton. (3 Credits)

Although some prose works are studied, the emphasis is upon Milton as a poet. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 403. Shakespeare. (3 Credits)

Major plays for understanding and appreciation. (Fall)

EN 404. Anglo-Saxon Language and Literature. (3 Credits)

This course will enable students to achieve basic reading fluency in Old English. It is the study of the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxon period (449 AD to 1066 AD). Students will learn the grammar of Old English and will be able to read, translate, and interpret texts such as The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Aelfric's homilies, The Dream of the Rood, and Beowulf. Students will also consider these texts in connection with the cultural and historical backgrounds.

EN 405. African-American Literature. (3 Credits)

An investigation of the development of African-American literature and an examination of selected writers of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 410. Black Southern Literature. (3 Credits)

This course will delve into the foundational role that Black Southern literature has had in the creation, growth, and continuation of the U.S. South as a geographic and/or as an imaginary space. While focused on U.S. Black Southern literature, the course will also recognize and hold space for Black literature produced in the tropical Souths of the Caribbean and Latin America. (Spring, even-numbered years).

EN 413. Transnational American Literature. (3 Credits)

This course will analyze the “transnational” turn in literature by re-examining national borders as porous, unbounded, and ever-changing. Potential topics may include slavery, colonialism, and capitalism; migration and immigration; and/or circulations of literary production, consumption, and influence. Course topics may rotate depending on the instructor’s area of interest and expertise, and students may receive credit for the British, American, or diversity component of the core (depending on the course topic).

EN 434W. Language and Gender. (3 Credits)

This course closely examines the nature and function of sex differences in written and spoken language on a cross-cultural basis. While the emphasis is on spoken and written language, some attention is also paid to differences in nonverbal communication. The contrasts between stereotypes, about how women and men communicate, and the actual occurring patterns are carefully examined. The significance of different communication patterns is considered in connection with theoretical models drawn from sociolinguistics, anthropology, and psychology.

EN 435W. Writing Protest and Dissent. (3 Credits)

Explores some of the 400 years of rich writings and accounts of America’s tradition of protest/dissent, and uses these as examples to guide and inspire student writing of protest literature.

EN 439. Technical Editing. (3 Credits)

Training in copy editing and practice in substantive editing skills in content, organization, and format. Students will focus on using typographic conventions, scientific symbols, style manuals, and publication guides.

EN 440W. Grant Writing and Management. (3 Credits)

This course provides students with knowledge necessary to identify relevant grant opportunities, prepare conceptual program and research-based proposals, develop and assess budgetary issues including capital support, and successfully manage and execute a grant. Special focus is placed on non-profit organizations. Also listed as IDS 440W but creditable only in field for which registered. Prerequisite: Students must have completed all English requirements as part of their General Education curriculum and have completed a “W” course within their major or program of study or their academic program’s level 2 QEP course.

EN 441. History of the English Language. (3 Credits)

Development of the English language and of modern English usage. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 442. Survey of Grammar. (3 Credits)

A study of contemporary English grammar comprising primarily morphology and syntax, with discussion of register and dialect.

EN 443. Instruction of Composition. (3 Credits)

Approaches to and practice in the instruction of English composition. Prerequisite: ABI/FBI background clearance and EN 323.

EN 444W. Grant Writing for the Creative Writer. (3 Credits)

This course is designed for students of Creative Writing, professionals who are teaching Creative Writing, and students working in the non-academic and non-profit world who plan to submit their works for grants, fellowships, and/or retreats in the Arts and Humanities.

EN 445W. Multimodel Writing. (3 Credits)

This course closely examines theories of Multimodality. Students will begin with a close examination of Gunther Kress, the father of multimodality and end with a 360 degree examination of the future impact multimodal writing will have within the field. A case study approach will be used to introduce students to the various problem solving techniques that writers must use when considering the impact of multimodality.

EN 450. Folklore of the American South. (3 Credits)

A study of the folk culture of the American South, including expression through foodways, folk belief, performance, and oral culture. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 452. The American Novel. (3 Credits)

Intensive study of the American novel with regard to genre, history, theme, or major author. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 453. The English Novel. (3 Credits)

Representative works in the development of the English novel. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 455W. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction and Drama. (3 Credits)

A workshop approach to writing and editing fiction and drama for publication, with special emphasis on structure, theme, and characterization. Prerequisite: EN 355W. (Fall)

EN 456W. Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry and Creative Nonfiction. (3 Credits)

A workshop approach to writing and editing poetry and creative nonfiction for publication, with emphasis on structure, theme, and craft. Prerequisite: EN 355W. (Spring)

EN 460. Literature of the American Frontier. (3 Credits)

Designed to expose students to works representative of a specific genre (frontier literature) and to a specific type of character (the frontier hero). Beginning with a look at the ancestral background with authors such as James Fenimore Cooper, and moving forward to such modern writers as Cormac McCarthy, the course will examine those traits that have served to mythologize the frontier hero, making him/her one of the most popular and enduring of American literary figures. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 463. Studies in Contemporary Global Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study of the changing forms and themes of recent works written outside of Britain and the U.S. The course may focus on the literature of a particular geographical region, historical period, genre, or topic. Texts not originally written in English will be studied in translation. Variable content course which may be repeated once.

EN 464. The Contemporary American Novel. (3 Credits)

A study of the changing forms and emerging themes of the American novel in the last ten years. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 465. Contemporary Poetry. (3 Credits)

Extensive reading in the works of contemporary British and American poets, with emphasis on their relationship to the literary traditions of the past and their innovations and experiments in matter and form. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 466. Sociolinguistics. (3 Credits)

This course serves the student as an exploration of the theories and applications of socially constituted approaches to language and its uses, with a focus on American language varieties.

EN 472W. Rhetoric: Argument and Style. (3 Credits)

An examination of the ideas in writing and speech from classical Greek origins to modern times, with a focus on composition and on analysis of essays and speeches. Also listed as COM 472W but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 475W. Literacy, Culture, and Writing. (3 Credits)

This course is an extensive study of the major themes that inform our understanding of written and oral discourse. Emphasis is given to the historical impact the written word has had upon the technological development of modern society.

EN 481. Selected Topics in Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of world literature. Prerequisite: EN 360.

EN 489W. Professional Writing Portfolio Workshop. (3 Credits)

EN 490. English Internship/Practicum. (3 Credits)

Special problems and projects emphasizing practical experience in professional job situations in writing through field assignments under departmental supervision. Prerequisite: written permission of the chair of the department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 491W. Senior Seminar. (3 Credits)

A capstone seminar designed to assess students' learning in the program. Required for the English Option I major. Must be taken in one of the last two semesters of course work within the English Option I major. Requires permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: EN 481.

EN 492. The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program. (3 Credits)

The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program is based on the belief that our society is strengthened when higher education is made widely accessible and allows participants to encounter each other as equals, often across profound social barriers. The program brings incarcerated ("inside") and non-incarcerated ("outside") people together for engaged and informed dialogue about crime, justice, and other issues of social concern. This program is delivered at Limestone Correctional Facility. Topics rotate based on the instructor's area of interest and expertise by involve intersections of literature and social/criminal justice such as Restorative Justice in American Literature. Course may be taken for credit more than once under different topics (Spring).

EN 494. Special Topics in Film Studies. (3 Credits)

A study of a selected period or subject in film. Topics might include censorship in cinema; women in film; avant-garde cinema; national cinemas; film movements; spirituality in film; race and cinema; film rhetoric; or adaptation. (Spring odd-numbered years or on sufficient demand).

EN 495W. Selected Topics in Writing. (3 Credits)

Designed to provide concentrated study in specific areas of written composition. (Spring)

EN 496. Selected Topics in English Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in narrow areas of English literature. (Spring, odd-numbered years, if demand sufficient)

EN 497. Selected Topics in American Literature. (3 Credits)

Concentrated study in narrow areas of American literature. (Fall, even-numbered years, if demand sufficient)

EN 499. Independent Study. (3 Credits)

Open to senior majors on approval of department head. Provides for independent study or research under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. Prerequisite: written permission of the chair of the department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)