RE - Religion (RE)

RE 111. World Religions. (3 Credits)

This course is an introduction to the major religious traditions of today’s world.Attention will be given to the origins, founders, and basic teachings of these religions and to the interrelationship of religions and cultures of people.

RE 199. Service Learning. (3 Credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to Service Learning through the integration of academic learning about local, national, and global issues with service work addressing those concerns. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

RE 221. Old Testament Introduction. (3 Credits)

Study of the writings of the Old Testament with special attention to the methods, principles, and tools for such study and to the historical, literary, and theological aspects and significance of these writings. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 231. New Testament Introductions. (3 Credits)

Study of the writings of the New Testament with special attention to the methods, principles, and tools for such study and to the historical, literary, and theological aspects and significance to these writings. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 303. Philosophy of Religion. (3 Credits)

A philosophical examination of religion. Topics covered include arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of religious experiences, the problem of evil, characteristics of divine nature religious belief and moral justification, and the relationship between faith and knowledge. Also listed as PHL 303 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

RE 321. Life of Jesus. (3 Credits)

The life and teachings of Jesus based primarily on the four Gospels with practical applications in relation to our current personal and social problems. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 331. Life and Letters of Paul. (3 Credits)

The life and teachings of Paul based on The Acts and The Epistles of Paul. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 359. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

RE 369. Special Course. (1-6 Credits)

Course number reserved for special courses offered from time to time in response to special circumstances. The courses are discipline specific with variable credit and when offered, they are identified by department content and credit.

RE 370. Prophets of the Hebrew Bible. (3 Credits)

A study of the message and socio-religious context of the prophets of the Hebrew Bible. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 380. Pastoral Leadership and Care. (3 Credits)

This course will explore the relationship between the twin aspects of practical ministry: pastoral leadership and pastoral care. Focus will be placed on the various styles and definitions of pastoral leadership as they have developed in various denominational traditions, i.e. congregational expectations, what works and what does not, and the ethics of pastoral leadership. Additionally, the course will focus on pastoral care as it has developed in various denominational traditions, i.e. manner and style of care and congregational expectations, and ethical behavior. The course is intended to provide awareness and practical guidance concerning essential duties associated with professional religious leadership.

RE 389. On-Campus Internship. (3 Credits)

RE 390. Special Topics. (3 Credits)

A study of one or more carefully selected religion topics. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 399. Departmental Service Learning. (1-6 Credits)

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to integrate academic learning about vital service issues within a specific discipline with service work addressing those issues. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Approval of supervising department required. (Offered upon sufficient demand.)

RE 411. Religion, Politics, and Public Policy. (3 Credits)

This class examines the theories and empirical research regarding the interaction between religious beliefs and institutions and political culture, elections, judicial decisions, public policy, public opinion, and group mobilization in the United States.

RE 430. Existentialism. (3 Credits)

This course examines various philosophical theories of Existentialism. It explores the 19th Century response to German Idealism (particularly Hegel) in the thought of Soren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Friedrich Nietzsche. From there, we explore the development of ideas in the works of Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, and the religious thought of Martin Buber. While this approach highlights a historical approach to the tradition, we will also give specific attention to the significant themes and issues that unify the diverse thinkers. In particular, the course explores what it means to live authentically, the nature of subjectivity, the human condition as it relates to anxiety, despair, boredom, freedom, alienation, and the human confrontation with nothingness, nihilism, and absurdity. Also listed as PHL 430 but creditable only in the field for which registered.

RE 470. History of Asian Religions. (3 Credits)

This course examines both the historical development and current content of the religious and philosophical traditions of Asia with special emphasis on Confucianism, Daoism, Shintoism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Hinduism. The course covers Japan, China, India, Tibet, other parts of Southeast Asia and East Asia. For each of these traditions, we will consider its history and mythology, the great themes and ideas which have shaped the worlds of meaning for the followers, and the ways of worshipping and achieving the good life, individually and socially.

RE 479. History of Religion in the United States. (3 Credits)

A nonsectarian survey of religion in United States history from the 17th century to the 21st, including, but not limited to, origins, revivalism, Catholicism, the rise of denominationalism in American Protestantism, civil religion, and the emergence of the holiness and charismatic movements. Also listed as HI 479 but creditable only in the field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 484. Philosophical Borderlands of Science and Religion. (3 Credits)

An interdisciplinary course concerning the ¿Demarcation Question¿¿ where do the borders of science end and religion begin? Both critical reasoning and historical analysis of those areas that have been perceived on the fringes of science, including: Alchemy, Astrology, Atlantis, Galileo and the Church, Mesmerism, Spiritualism, Theosophy, ESP, Near-Death Experiences, UFO¿s and Alien Abductions, Eugenics, the New Age Movements, and the Tao of Physics. A strong philosophical component is included, particularly the application of logical fallacies. Also listed as HI 484 and PHL 484 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

RE 490. Special Topics. (3 Credits)

A study of one or more carefully selected religion topics.(Offered on sufficient demand)